Dating in manteno il

Here I will offer quality, yet affordable, authentic artifacts from throughout the Americas. At the base of each handle, upper body of the vessel, are two nicely detailed human figures, lying flat. This type of ancient 'money' was used in the trading (and purchasing) of merchandise by the Inca. Each has a large nose and impressed eyes and mouth. The seated figure has an area of fire clouding on the back and a restored hand. Both are from the same estate collection; they were likely found together and appear to have been made by the same artist. The eyes and nose are sculpted in high relief with pierced nostrils and slit mouth. 0 — Mexico 1200 BC - 800 BC A rare Copilco pottery figure dating to the Middle Pre-classic Period. The upper half of the vessel is intricately carved. 0 — Ecuador 600 BC - 300 BC A very rare Chorrera erotic whistle vessel from ancient Ecuador. 5 — West Mexico 300 BC - 300 AD Two partial obsidian pectorals. Both flutes are in playable condition with nice tones and have two pierced holes used for suspension around the neck. The face is framed with large slab panels that create a massive headdress. He wears elaborate regalia; the headdress features opposing birds with heads turned backward. 0 — Vera Cruz, Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A rare and exceptional Sonriente figure from the Remojadas region of ancient Veracruz. 17.5" x 9.5" 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 400 AD A large Nayarit plate (shallow bowl) from ancient West Mexico. 0 — Mexico 400 AD - 750 AD A Teotihuacan tripod vessel from ancient Mexico. The three gracefully curving legs are decorated with stylized bird heads with long beaks, likely representing the heads of pelicans. A chip on the spout is restored, but it is otherwise intact. A few minor scrapes and dings along with light deposits (consistent with age) as would be expected. Smaller than most of this type, but is a really cute piece that displays well. The painting style and motif of each vessel is nearly identical. 3.5" tall x 5" across 5 — Ecuador 1000 AD - 1500 AD A large and exceptional Manteno figural tripod vessel from Pre-Columbian Ecuador. It enabled them to induce shamanic trances and visions. Nicely carved from a greenish-gray stone in the form of a celt. A few edge chips along with minor scrapes and dings, but overall a nice example and rarely seen in this size. Near excellent condition with restoration to one leg; else intact and choice.This gallery will be regularly updated so check back often. The surface is burnished blackware with light deposits, mainly in the crevices. Minor chips missing from the edge of the spout, otherwise completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Much like the copper hoe-money (tajaderas) that was used by the Aztecs of Mexico. They wear arm bands, elaborate (tassel-like) ear assemblages and head wraps. The standing figure has a restored hand and partially restored foot. An exceptionally rare, very closely matching pair of ancient figures. The orangeware vessel is painted overall in black and reds with complex geometric designs of linear and angular patterns. One eye is chipped otherwise completely intact with no cracks, breaks or repairs. The Copilco culture was one of the first and most important ceremonial centers in the Valley of Mexico during that time. A wide band at the midsection shows a connected diamond pattern. Constructed of grayish terracotta, burnished overall and painted with faint wide bands (in red) around the outer edge. At the top are two stepped ridges that encircle the spout, loop handle and spherical whistles. 0 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A beautifully painted 'Pataky Polychrome' tripod vessel from the Nicoya-Guanacaste region of ancient Costa Rica. Nicely knapped from black volcanic glass, these rare and fragile objects were worn as pectorals via two suspension holes. At the lower front, the lord's hands extend outward holding staffs decorated with beaded plumes. He also wears large ear spools and a beaded necklace with multi-layered tassels. Hollow, terracotta construction; it depicts a seated youth with typical gleeful expression. Polychrome painted in the 'fineline' technique with red and black against a tan slip. Townsend's "Ancient West Mexico", page 79, for similar examples and info on this type. A cylindrical bowl sits on three solid rectangular legs. The legs are hollow and contain numerous rattle balls. Light surface wear consistent with age and extended burial, but is intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Most likely found together and probably created (or at least painted) by the same artist. 5.25" tall x 6" across 5 — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A well made Nayarit olla with fine-line decoration. Constructed of gray terracotta clay with areas of brown burnished surfacing. During such altered states of consciousness, shamans would communicate with spiritual beings as well as the deceased, and travel on shamanic journeys in the supernatural realm. Displays well on custom metal stand which is included as shown. A few imperfections but shows nice deposits and has a sharp chiseled edge. Collection of Bernard and Bernadette Lueck, Founders of the Heritage of the Americas Museum in El Cajon, California. Celt 1 (left) - Well carved from a blue-green hardstone showing fine details. A large example with an elegant form that displays beautifully.Start the journey by taking the e Harmony Personality Profile and get feedback that details how you relate to other Illinois singles.

You can find a Sex Addicts Anonymous Meeting near you by selecting your state of choice. Kymber and I Hope to seeya out on the road this Spring and Summer!4/1 Towanda, IL Duncan Manor (SOLD OUT) 4/8 Charleston, IL The Uptowner 4/14 Fort Atkinson, WI Cafe’ Carpe 4/15 La Crosse, WI Midwest Music Fest 4/20 Newport, KY Southgate House Revival 4/28 Joliet, IL Chicago St. Pub 5/2 Peoria, IL Folkin Tuesday Reunion at Kenny’s 5/5 Effingham, IL Village Wine 5/11 Maumee, OH The Village Idiot 5/12 Pittsburgh, PA Club Cafe 5/13 Indianapolis, IN Virginia Ave.— Peru 900 AD - 1350 AD A rare Ica (Ika) aryballos from southern coastal Peru. The Storm God is shown here in the typical fashion with googled eyes, ear spools, large fangs and split tongue. Each side of the vessel shows two nicely detailed, mythological figures in battle; all carved in high relief. Acquired via inheritance from her mother who was an artist, collector and world travler. Although referred to as 'axes', these were not made for use as weapons, but were chisels (tools) used to shape and carve stone. Additional linear and geometric designs complete the complex imagery. Small chips on one leg and at the rim edge have been restored along with light paint enhancements. As is typical, it is shown in the seated position and has shortened, bulbous legs tapering to the feet. The leaves of the coca plant were mixed with ground lime, wrapped into a small bundle (called a quid) and chewed to stave off hunger and alleviate altitude sickness. Most of the damage was concentrated around the base (neck) area. Painted in a dark brown-black slip over a cream background, the ovoid-shaped body has realistically sculpted head and forearms held to the face. The front and back sections are painted with linear stripes. The spout has been reattached and a couple of cracks along the body have been restored. Decorated with horizontal and vertical lines and a circular 'eye' design at the rim. A few small chips restored at the rim and light paint enhancements, otherwise intact and original. Some areas of light surface erosion, minor paint loss and deposits remain. It has pierced tapered tripod legs, each containing several large rattle balls. Approx 8.25" tall x 8.25" across 5 — Peru 900 AD - 1100 AD A fine Chancay whistle vessel from ancient Peru. The form is somewhat similar to the later Inca aryballo, but it is unpainted and an unusual shape. Aryballo vessels are seldom seen from this culture. The head shows an elongated snout with appliqued nostrils, coffee-bean style eyes and pierced ears. In good condition with restored breaks and some losses replaced as is common. Condition is very good, especially considering its enormous size. The sides are decorated with complex geometric patterns that are similar, but different from the plate. The shallow bowl is polychrome painted with red and black on an orange background. The exterior has wide bands of red and smaller black lines circling the outer rim. Assembled from four original pieces and the break lines restored along with some light paint touch ups. Originally acquired in 1972 from Hartwell Kennard of Mc Allen, Texas. 6.5" across 0 — Guatemala 250 AD - 600 AD A huge Maya tripod cylinder vessel dating the the Early Classic Period. The figure is nicely adorned with elaborate ear spools and bracelets. An amazing collection of 21 (twenty-one) Pre-Columbian miniatures. 0 — Peru 700 AD - 1500 AD A gorgeous Lambayeque whistle vessel from ancient Peru. The chocolate brown surface is nicely burnished inside and out. Assembled from around a dozen original pieces with breaks restored and some losses replaced. A rare example, the interior (tonto) is divided into three segments. Painted with red over buff-gray terracotta along with some teal paint remaining in the crevices. Two fingers and a portion of the strap across the head have been replaced. Two sets of museum codes written in ink across the top. Vessels with articulated parts are exceedingly rare in Costa Rican pottery. Minor losses replaced and several repaired breaks at the rim. Two of the legs have been reattached and partially restored. Sackler Collections" for a similar example and additional information.A barrel-form vessel with cylindrical body topped by loop handles and flared spout. The arms and legs are diminutive; one hand is holding a long tendril that extends up one side and past the rim. The scene on both sides of the vessel depict the Moche Protector God (Ai Apaec) in combat with the underworld Decapitator God. Both are very heavily cast; thick and heavy with large 'T' flanges. Minor surface losses, general wear overall and deposits present. Depicted nude, as is common, wearing only multi-layered ear ornaments. One leg reattached, small losses along the break have been replaced and the break line restored. Light erosion and minor losses around the mouth, eyes and nose. This example is realistically sculpted, showing large eyes and face paint representing ritual scarification or facial tattooing. The nicely burnished surface shows ample deposits, light surface wear and some fire clouding on the back of the head. Inherited from his father who was a member of the Peruvian Consulate in Argentina, originally collected prior to 1970. Also the tail and rear legs have been partially restored, but it is mostly original and appears complete. The legs support a spherical bowl with a ridged shoulder and topped by a flared spout. Likely a depiction of a stylized bird head or the head of the mythological dragon creature. It has two barrel-shaped chambers with footed bases, joined at the sides and again by an arched strap handle. The front is rounded (domed) but the reverse is flattened to provide more comfort and stability as the vessel was carried across the back via a woven trump-line that looped through the handles and across the carrier's forehead. One small handle chip has been restored and there is light pitting, mostly around the bottom and the spout, otherwise intact and original. Constructed from buff (tan) terracotta with a burnished orange-red slip on the figure and spout. Assembled from approximately eight original pieces with restored break lines, but appears intact. The head, one hand and both arms reattached at the shoulders with break lines restored. A single stress crack, that went from the outer edge toward the center has been restored along with very minor paint touch ups. Some light paint loss and deposits overall, as would be expected. The bowl sits on three massive legs that are in the form of stylized jaguar heads. 5 — Peru 350 AD - 600 AD A Moche Canchero from Peru. 0 — Mexico 300 BC - 100 BC A Chupicuaro tripod rattle vessel. Deposits and root marks present, mostly on the underside. The elegant form shows strong Teotihuacan influence. 5 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A nicely painted Nicoya figure from ancient Costa Rica. His face is expressive with pointed chin and elongated coffee bean eyes. Completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. The collection includes vessels, human and animal figures, a tiny mace head and three working whistles . It features a seated shaman atop four conjoined globular chambers, all painted with linear and spiral designs typical of Lambayeque pottery. The tapered spout has been reattached with the break restored. Minor surface wear, dings and scratches along with light deposits consistent with age. Each section is separated by red, black and purple borders surrounding mythological 'dragons'. One foot has been reattached and the break restored. There are light stains (sticker residue) on both sides. Approx 13.5" tall x 7" across 0 — Peru 450 AD - 550 AD An exceptional Moche stirrup vessel dating to Phase IV.

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